One interviewee must be a cultural insider (i.e., a person who was born and raised in korea).

Each student will explore what “Korea” and “Korean” mean by using interview method. Interview two people. One interviewee must be a cultural insider (i.e., a person who was born and raised in Korea). The other interviewee could be a cultural outsider (i.e., a person who was born and raised outside Korea) or an in-betweener (i.e., a person who was born in Korea but
<

<

raised outside Korea, or a person who was born outside Korea but lived in Korea communities long enough to understand Korean culture). Be sure to record their background information such as age, gender, occupation, their position in the insider-outsider spectrum, etc.
<

Ask them a series of questions. The list of questions here is by no means exhaustive; but it is a good place to start.
<

• What do “Korea” and “Korean” mean to you?
<

• How do you define “Korea” and “Korean culture”?
<

• Any distinctive characteristics of “Korea” and “Korean culture”?
<

• Any anecdotes that gave you ideas about “Korea” and “Korean culture”?
<

Take notes when having conversations. You may use any recording devices only with the interviewees’ consent. Ultimately, your task is to critically examine their answers. Consider the following questions:
<

• Any similarities or differences among the answers of the two interviewees?
<

• Any missing points that must have been addressed?
<

• Do you think your interviewees’ position as a cultural insider, cultural outsider, or
<

cultural in-betweener affect their perspective on Korean culture?
<

• Based on your interviews, what do “Korea” and “Korean culture” mean?
<

1 inch margin / Times New Romans 12
<

• Information about your interviewees
<

• Compare and contrast the two interviews
<

• Your critical examination
<

• A cool title!
<

• Organization: Introduction—Body—Conclusion
<

• Make sure to have it proofread!

GRAB 30% OFF ON YOUR ASSIGNMENTS NOW